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Guys, we have so many ideas for fun, time-consuming posts and for some of them we even have all the illustrations (sort-of) ready. But today is not the day we will share one of those. Instead here’s a sneak peek of two illustrations from our current project, a very exciting one for us, a book for children about local architecture. It’s keeping us occupied now, together with an extensive house repairs project (ugh, aren’t those the worst?), and so the big posts have to wait a little longer.

Of course, we’ll share more of the book once it’s ready.

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janeczko_0005A while ago we designed a CD packaging for a CD with five talks by a professor of mathematics from Warsaw. He talks about social and psychological phenomena, presenting them through mathematical formulas. Obviously, this was an instant and thrilling challenge to find motifs which are both mathematical and can illustrate the specific themes of the talks. We finally chose to base the illustrations on vectors (not as in vector graphics but as in mathematical vectors that look like arrows).

janeczko_0001janeczko_0006The project is called Faces of Science. To See the Invisible and the five talks are titled: 1. Life 2. Man 3. Ambitions 4. Relationships 5. Science. We came up with an icon/illustration including two arrows for each of them. The client also wanted us to draw the portrait of the professor, which we’re always happy to do, and as far as we know the professor enjoyed it. We chose lively, strongly contrasted colors, a circular composition and a dot grid for a scientific yet energetic effect.

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janeczko_0007The project was created for Podpunkt studio.

re-walk-01While we’re still swamped with a ton of work, we took a (very short) break to share with you one more book we bought after our trip to London and it might be actually our favorite. It is called Walk This World by Lotta Nieminen and it shows a walk through various cities of the world in one day. Each spread is given to one city that the children should guess, using such clues as clothing, bits of language, famous monuments and even colors. Some are harder, some easier but all very pretty.

But that’s not even the best part, cool as it is! The best part is that it has those flaps of paper you can open to peek underneath and see what’s inside the buildings. I’m sure we’re well past the target age but we thoroughly enjoyed opening those windows and doors and chuckled at the humorous illustrations. Combined with nice illustrations, an exquisite sense of color and good production values, this is another book on our long list that we recommend to all you book aficionados out there, whether you have children or not.

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The whole journey starts in New York. (Sorry for the gif-y graininess but we wanted to show you the hidden illustrations.)

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This is Sydney spread with its lovely color palette and whatever’s hiding in a kangaroo:

re-walk-03re-walk-05Of course we couldn’t overlook Paris, with Mona Lisa hidden in the Louvre:

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And here’s Italy and the insides of a volcano:

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(Italy actually looks like a mix of several cities, which is a bit surprising at least to our European sensitivities but whatever, it’s still gorgeous.)

re-infobox-02This is a little job we did a while ago for InfoBox, which is an institution of Gdynia set up for the promotion of the city and for chronicling the changes happening (such as investments and urban development). We designed a T-shirt for the opening of InfoBox, illustrating their tagline “The Observatory of Changes.” We wanted the illustration to be simple and playful and to engage the element of the logo (we also designed the logo a longer while ago). The number of colors was limited by the printing technique but that was actually for the best. As Gdynia is located by the sea, seagulls are a common (and sometimes a little scary) sight here. (Seriously, seagulls are creepy.)

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re-strzelecki-05Ugh, late again, but please bear with us, this summer is very busy. Today untypically we wanted to share with you recent work, a poster for a competition organized by the Museum of Emigration in Gdynia that we’re rather happy with. The competition asks participants to, while traveling, find a cool Polish emigrant abroad and take a picture or make a movie about them. The tagline is “Man above Borders” and we decided to focus the illustration on this (and, I guess, on focus).

We were pleased to have a chance to do something out of paper and spent a good part of a Saturday cutting out the world and people popping out of it. And then we also spend a Tuesday on doing it all over again when the idea changed some. That’s fine, though, we’re easily amused, as I tend to repeat.

Orange is a brand color for the Museum, which allowed for the unusual color scheme (we tried blue, but orange won). We focused (there, I did it again) on details, too, like placing the Museum logo so that it’s exactly below the focus frame. And we even managed to add small illustrations. It’s always a lot of fun when a project leaves us enough freedom to  try out more unusual solutions.

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Not exactly the making of, but bits and pieces of the poster:

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And the whole poster:

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As we keep working on our not-yet-to-be-shown projects, we use the opportunity to continue with the awesome books we have recently bought. We could be doing it for a year and more but we’re planning to actually return to showing our creative efforts soon. However, for today enjoy these.

In one of the previous book-related posts we showed you a catalog for Gierymski’s exhibition in Warsaw but that wasn’t all we brought from that show. The museum also published quite a charming companion publication for children. Now, we’re great fans of this kind of part-educational, part-entertaining materials accompanying exhibitions (hint, hint, we’d love to make some) and are often a little disappointed by their quality and lack of original ideas. But this one is actually what we might expect, with nice design and illustrations, tasks that make sense and even a pleasant kind of paper.

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Alice in Wonderland and the Moomin series are some of these books that you don’t even have to come across in early childhood and you will still enjoy them and then the magic just stays with you forever. They are even not so much about storylines – though we love those too – as about the atmosphere. So finding a combination of both in Tate’s bookstore in the form of Alice illustrated by Tove Jansson left us dumbfounded with delight. Apparently this was originally a Swedish edition then published by Tate in English and Jansson’s illustrating style matches wonderfully the dreamy nature of Carroll’s story. We’ve seen many versions of Alice‘s illustrations and normally we will always pick the classic version by John Tenniel, but this one is definitely worth having. Maybe because it has this nostalgic quality that books from childhood will have for adults.

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And the last book is perhaps the most stunning of all. The High Street by Alice Melvin apparently won some sort of award for best new illustrator and no wonder at all. We also found it in Tate and fell in love with it but when we read it our fascination increased even. It tells a story of a girl gone shopping through an array of old-fashioned little shops, each selling one type of products rather than everything, mall-style. In this it basks in the passing (or maybe returning? that would be awesome) glory of small shops. The illustrating style is lovely in that it combines a bit of theme-becoming old-fashioned-ness with modern clarity. This is exactly what we love, especially seeing as each illustration has a lot of details and you can look at it over and over. But the best part is that the illustrations showing shops can be folded out to reveal the inside of the shop! Now, I’m quite secure in saying that many of you must share our fascination with the inside of buildings that you only see from the outside. As children we loved this kind of drawings and we still do. So, this is a perfect little book, both in idea and execution (it even has a plot twist!), and we encourage you to buy it, should you have a chance (no, no one is paying us for all these recommendations though they may, if they want to).

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We didn’t see as much of London as we had planned but we did visit a whole lot of museum gift stores and today we’ll show you how our collections of pocket pop-up books is growing. We bought the first ones in Paris but Britain has more of them: we found five (to Paris’ three). However, sorry but the French name Petit pop-up panoramique wins with English A Three-Dimensional Expanding Guide. No challenge there.

Still, the illustrations are just as charming (by the same illustrators, mostly) and we were thrilled each time we found a new one in a bookstore. We’re easily amused people.

re-popup-02 We didn’t see a whole lot of royal palaces but we liked the book.

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We did manage to visit Trafalgar Square and Westminster Abbey (the square quite a few times because we went to the National Gallery twice and also you always seem to end up there when you start doing touristy things).

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And of course we’ve already told you about Tate Modern a few times. We enjoyed the bookstore there too.

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We didn’t hope for much from the Tower of London but we were pleasantly surprised: what an entertaining place it actually is. And the ravens were awesome.

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But our favorite was the last find, Shakespeare, which we only discovered at the Globe, where we just dropped in for a few minutes on our last day. One side shows places connected with Shakespeare’s biography but the other one shows scenes from various plays, which is very refreshing after all the architecture of the other volumes. It helps that we’re currently re-reading all of Shakespeare, probably.

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