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re:commendations

200531-redesign_studio-recommendations-a_thousand_acres

In an exciting first, this month we want to recommend a book. You might have heard of it already because it’s definitely not a new book, but we’d still like to add our personal praise to whatever you already know.

A Thousand Acres by Jane Smiley

What is it? A 1992 Pulitzer winner, it retells the story of King Lear, placing his quarreling family in rural Iowa. Basically, it’s Shakespeare among Iowan farmers, with all the passions, feuds and dark psychological insights. It also has a powerful ecological undertone, which is hard to ignore.

Why we love it? Smiley takes the spotlight away from the traditional protagonists of King Lear and instead focuses on the original villains who lose their villainy in the process (there is a villain, just not who Shakespeare envisioned). The narrator is the oldest daughter and her relationship with her younger sister (they’re named appropriately Ginny and Rose) creates the core of the story. The characters are drawn with insight and compassion and the reinterpretation of the classic feels very timely. A great read for any fan of a retelling (which we certainly are).

200427-redesign_studio-recommendations-locke_and_key

Boy, do we have a treat for you today. (That is assuming you don’t know this one already; it’s by no means a new thing.) If all the staying at home left you with extra time, why not take up a marvelous graphic novel:

Locke & Key

What is it? A marvelous graphic novel! The comic was written by Joe Hill, illustrated by Gabriel Rodriguez and it consists of six volumes that tell a full, complete story and a few extras. It’s a story of the Locke family, their loss, their growth and, of course, their magical mansion.

Why we love it? Never since Sandman had we been so engrossed in the comic world: its atmosphere, mythology and brilliance. It made us feel all the feelings and truly fall in love with the characters. The story is wonderfully constructed, with no unnecessary additions. It rewards readers for paying attention but even those we don’t are sure to enjoy themselves.

Visually speaking, the art of Rodriguez, to be quite honest, took us a moment to get used to, especially when paired with the relative brutality of the first volume. But after a few issues we didn’t even remember what our problem with it was. He creates the world with such assurance and maestry. And his architectural background makes the Locke house a character in the story, and a very intriguing one.

(There’s also a Netflix adaptation of the comic but we haven’t seen it so far so we can’t say whether it’s as good.)

re-commendations-impulseOn December we skipped recommending stuff to you because Christmas and work took up all of our time anyway. But this month we’re back with another show that we think you might like and that kept us excited this month.

Impulse (season 1 and 2)

What is it? A show by YouTube Red tells a story of Henry, a teenage girl with a superpower: she teleports. This is not your run-of-the-mill superhero story, though. It’s also not a teen drama, not really.

Why we love it? It’s a surprisingly mature and original story: not so much a story for teenagers as about them. It captures well the frustratingly bad choices teenagers make. It also sets itself an ambitious task of examining the consequences of sexual trauma and of unconventional parenting. And we truly love Henry’s sidekicks, Jenna and Townes, who are shown with warmth and sensitivity.

Visually speaking, the tone is confidently bleak and cold, Henry’s town consistently uninviting. Everyone wears winter clothes, which we appreciate because Hollywood notoriously ignores low temperatures, having people dressed in T-shirts in winter. We could live without the shaky camera, though.

redesign_studio-recommendations-carnival_rowMany of the projects we are working on now take a long time to complete and longer to photograph and so we thought to add a new feature to our blog which would allow us to share with you also some other things that we spend our time on (instead of the constant sneak peeks). We don’t even want to focus on strictly design-related things but rather draw your attention to different things you might like.

Every end of the month we are going to recommend to you one thing that kept us involved and excited and tell you why. We’re starting with:

Carnival Row (season 1)

What is it? A fantasy show from Amazon Studios, showing an alternate reality where fantasy creatures live alongside humans in a sort-of Victorian reality. However, the politics of the world are messy (and heavily a metaphor of non-fantasy politics, but we’ll let it slide), the persecution increasing and, to make matters worse, mysterious crimes ravage the capital. The story focuses on a police inspector and a pixie refugee who used to be a couple and now reconnect.

Why we love it? For the meticulous world-building, an interesting plot and some great acting (particularly from the supporting actors though we gotta admit: Orlando Bloom ages well). Also, we’re suckers for all sorts Victoriana and if it has a whiff of magic, all the better.

Visually speaking, the not-London is stunning. Clearly, the creators paid a lot of attention to detail and to differentiating between locations. It pays off.