redesign-easter-board-4As promised last week, we want to share a few photos of our Easter card for this year to prove that we make questionable decisions with our time (I mean, we did make all these plasticine eggs and rabbits but we didn’t exactly clean up all the kitchen cupboards for Easter).

This year we decided to honor one of our favorite holiday pastimes, which is boardgames. After designing the board itself we made a list of all the 3D elements we wanted to include and set down to modelling. In the background we played Kiki’s Delivery Service: this is off-topic but we’re always happy to recommend this charming movie.


A big part of the work was mixing the colors because we only had a very basic set. Luckily, since our work on the surrealist manifesto, we had a lot of white plasticine left and we used it to make prettier, pastel colors. This was a very painterly part of the design.


Carrots and eggs were fairly easy to make but the real challenge and fun came with shaping the animals.  Of course, we’re particularly proud of the fox.

redesign-easter-rabbits redesign-easter-fox-rabbit redesign-easter-flowers redesign-easter-basketOnce all the elements were ready we arranged them on the board so that there would be a bit of dramatic tension.

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As we try not to be hoarders (which, we find, is a bit of an occupational hazard) we kept the board for a week as an Easter decoration in our living room but then we recycled the elements. This allowed for making this neat infographics illustrating which colors appeared in what amounts. All in all, working in this organic way was extremely refreshing and we only wish we had more opportunities to do this in everyday work.


re-motivation-02Last week we introduced our project Words Matter, a series of book covers employing tangible type so it’s high time to start sharing the covers. The first one is one of the simplest (and definitely, definitely the easiest and fastest to make) but it’s still one of our favorites because of the simple fact: the letters of the title form a pyramid so well and it illustrates the book so perfectly. When we discovered this we were really excited and the cover almost designed itself.

Abraham Maslow, one of the great in the history of psychology, studied child development and came up with the idea of the hierarchy of needs, which he expressed in 1954 book Motivation and Personality. He illustrated the idea with a neat diagram in the shape of a pyramid. Unlike for other covers we didn’t create the letters: we used ready-made children blocks. We actually bought a whole set of the classic-looking wooden kind, similar to ones we had as children. We really liked the vivid colors and emphasized them with the bright warm yellow background to add to the sense of fun and play.


As was our plan with all the covers, the selected material and form illustrated the important themes of the book: not only the pyramid itself, but also children and their way of combining fun with education.

As you will see, for all the covers we offset the extravagant tangible type with simple typography used for the name and spine and the logo we described last week. Back covers were not actually a big part of the academic project, just a chance to play some more with the solutions chosen for each cover. For each back we created the WM logo in the same way as we did the title on the front. As you may see, the design of the back cover also includes the space for a blurb but have not written the blurbs, not yet anyway, so for now the backs are fairly minimalistic.


re-shop-friendsAnd a completely different thing that you might find interesting: it’s another week of free shipping on Society6 so if you wanted to buy a poster, that’s as good a chance as they get. Simply use this link.


Here goes: we did read Fifty Shades of Grey. We tend to read bestsellers in hope that what made so many people happy will also work for us. Well, it’s sometimes true; sometimes it definitely isn’t. With Fifty Shades we got to be a hit at parties for a little while when we summarized the story to people who had not read it (“No way! You’re making it up, right?”) so there’s that. But, all in all, we don’t really get the popularity of this book.

One thing we found very puzzling was the style of the book and, among other things, how some words would keep reappearing even though they didn’t really fit. Maybe because of our recent work on Friends, we thought how a word-of-the-day toilet paper (the kind that Joey once had) would explain the use of certain words. And once we thought of it, we simply had to reverse engineer this imaginary item and share it with you.

50-words-2-rollWell, we simply had to comment on the phenomenon of Fifty Shades, using the occasion of the world première of the movie. If you count yourselves among the fans, bear with us: I’m sure you hate something we love, too. If you don’t: yep. This book might be a terrifying social experiment. Otherwise, we just don’t get it.

Also, happy Valentine’s!







The slight delay in posting is not so much due to end-of-year festivities as to the time-consuming nature of the project we’re presenting today.

2014 marked the 20th anniversary of the first episode of Friends and the 10th anniversary of the last one. And yesterday all 10 seasons of the show became available on Netflix (we hear). To celebrate all these momentous occasions we have created a poster with an icon for each of the 236 episodes of Friends. That’s a lot of icons.

poster_friends_wizBut Friends were with us when we were kids and they repeated every episode over and over and we still found them funny, and then we were no longer kids and still re-watched an episode here and there and still found them funny. It was before we got fed up with sitcoms; we loved the characters (well, most of them) and even how they gradually changed: from the crazy 80s hair to their stylish(er) looks and grown-up relationships. We were there for the iconic moments: “We were on a break,” “smelly cat,” “holiday armadillo” all meant something to us. And, you’re very free to disagree, but we always loved Monica and Chandler together.

During the research for this poster we re-watched a lot of bits of the show again and sure, it grows old, but it grows old with surprising grace.

So this is our tribute to Friends. If you like it, you may even buy it here or here. The icons are fairly small in this full version (we particularly don’t recommend buying mini sizes, we just can’t turn them off) so keep reading to see ten additional posters, one for each seasons (with links to buy them).

May the New Year be wonderful for you, full of wacky, hilarious, supportive friends and other good things!

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And here are 10 posters for 10 seasons, as promised.

friends-20-redesign-season01Season 1: The One Where They Get a Monkey, a Fussball Table and Rachel (buy here).


Season 2: The One Where Joey Moves Out and Back In (buy here).


Season 3: The One with All the Drama with Ross and Rachel (buy here).


Season 4: The One That Ends in London (buy here).


Season 5: The One with Monica and Chandler’s Secret (buy here).


Season 6: The One Where Monica and Chandler Get Engaged (buy here).


Season 7: The One Where Monica and Chandler Get Married (buy here).


Season 8: The One with Rachel’s Pregnancy (buy here).


Season 9: The One Largely about Babies (buy here).


Season 10: The Last One Where They All Become Adults (Except for Joey) (buy here; all posters can also be bought here).

re-lego-cats-4-01Our London holiday (you figured out it was London, didn’t you?) was all kinds of controversial though Matisse cut-outs exhibition at Tate Modern is wonderful. Seriously, if you are in London or will be any time soon, you HAVE to see it, it’s incredible.

But now we’re back and present the last batch of Lego cats, mostly for completionist reasons.

re-lego-cats-4-06Felix prancing around sleeping Garfield.


re-lego-cats-4-05Hobbes (or is it Calvin? Just kidding, it’s Hobbes. It’s my favorite, by the way.)

re-lego-cats-4-07Simba and Mufasa.

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We were toying with the idea of a paper diorama for a while but didn’t have a project to try it on. However, our holiday cards are often a great place to test new ideas. Now, a paper diorama by re:design comes in the following stages.

1. You roughly sketch the ideas. 2. You pick out appropriate paper. 3. You cut out the shapes with a knife and a pair of surgical scissors, listening to Treasure Island on LibriVox (seriously, LibriVox is cool). Also, you forget to document these stages. 4. You throw away all the extra birds and daffodils that you cut out with excessive enthusiasm.

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5. Now the main thing about diorama is that it has layers. Otherwise it’d be just a cutout. So then you come up with ideas of how to make those layers if you didn’t plan it sufficiently before cutting the shapes out. In the end you use books and Lego pieces (Lego has so many uses in our household. You’ve no idea.). And also bluetack, another indispensable tool.  At first we vaguely planned to make a vertical diorama but it turned out to be too time-consuming for Saturday before Easter with a half of the house not yet cleaned and the family already arriving for Easter stay.

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6. You shoot. You edit. You post. Voilà.

And here’s how arranging the shoot looks like:


In case the foxes have you puzzled, they were a nod to our last year’s card.


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