Archive

Tag Archives: children’s books

mizielinscy-maps-25

It is the time of holiday traveling but this year we only travel with our finger on the map. So it is at least good to have a set of nice maps to do this and the one we want to share today is a book by Aleksandra and Daniel Mizielińscy, who (almost) literally drew the whole world.

mizielinscy-maps-02

Maps is a large-format illustrated book for children (but also quite interesting for adults) and it’s full of, well, maps. Each chapter starts with a map of a continent and then shows maps of selected countries. For each country the map is covered with local animals, foods, clothes, customs and other surprises.

mizielinscy-maps-03

The beauty of this book is in its scope and detail. You can spend quite a lot of time looking for things you missed before. Mizielińscy also design typography for their illustrations (you can even buy those fonts) so the typographic part of the book is carefully designed. All in all, if maps are your thing, you should give this book a try, at least to acknowledge the impressive effort. (Fair warning though: it is a bit eurocentric. But it still has a lot of material on the rest of the world so don’t be discouraged.)

Our version that we’re showing is in Polish but there are other translations out there: here is Amazon’s link to the English version and here is an activity book based on Maps (we don’t have this one though; but if you do, let us know if it’s good).

Great Britain. Europe is given a loving treatment but, well, we understand.

mizielinscy-maps-06

Switzerland.

mizielinscy-maps-07

Sweden and all the famous Swedes.

mizielinscy-maps-05

France and examples of French fauna.

mizielinscy-maps-08mizielinscy-maps-23

mizielinscy-maps-22

Dutch painters.

mizielinscy-maps-24

Japan.

mizielinscy-maps-09

South America.

mizielinscy-maps-13mizielinscy-maps-14

Africa.

mizielinscy-maps-04

Close-up on Egypt.

mizielinscy-maps-21

Canada.

mizielinscy-maps-11

And the US.

mizielinscy-maps-12

mizielinscy-maps-20

With a bit of Mexico.

mizielinscy-maps-17

And off to the cold areas.

mizielinscy-maps-15

Which have huskies.

mizielinscy-maps-19mizielinscy-maps-18

Flags of the world’s countries.

mizielinscy-maps-16

redesign-walk_in_london-01

As it seems unlikely that we will be doing any more travelling this holiday season, instead we are remembering one of our previous trip, the one to London, with a charming book called, well, A Walk in London.

The book is by Salvatore Rubbino and includes spreads on all the well-known tourist attractions as viewed by a little tourist, the main character in the book.

We really like the illustration style of the book: on the one hand, it’s very light – it recalls the freshness of a child’s drawing (something many illustrators try to do). On the other hand, this is clearly not a child’s drawing: in its color scheme and page compositions it has the sophistication of an adult artist.

Title page. Thames is definitely the axis around which the book is built.

redesign-walk_in_london-11

A map, always an interesting design part of such books.

redesign-walk_in_london-10

The typography is a bit messy, which seems to be popular in children’s books these days. It doesn’t work for all books but here it adds to the liveliness of the spreads.

redesign-walk_in_london-06redesign-walk_in_london-03redesign-walk_in_london-09

We loved Tower of London! It’s such a cool place.

redesign-walk_in_london-05redesign-walk_in_london-08redesign-walk_in_london-04

And yes, there is a foldout with the panorama of the Thames bank and the multiple attractions one can find there.

redesign-walk_in_london-02

And the index (with its over-the-top typography).

redesign-walk_in_london-07

As long as we’re not doing any actual travelling, reading about it, especially in books which we can share with J, is the second best thing.

redesign-berlin_books01

Yes, we’re back. We came back in the middle of the mess our renovations are still causing and it was also the end of the semester, which meant grading, so yep, in short we missed an update – sorry! However, it’s time for the traditional round of “The Books We Bought While Away.” This time, though, it’s going to be a short round, guys.

Truth of the matter is, we bought exactly two books. (We saw a few other interesting things but we ended up ordering them on Amazon afterwards. We’ll share when they arrive.) The first one was the kind we always buy instead of postcards and other souvenirs: a pop-up illustrated panorama. You saw them before on our blog and here’s the Berlin edition:

Illustrations by Sarah McMenemy.

redesign-berlin_books02redesign-berlin_books04redesign-berlin_books05redesign-berlin_books06

One of the few attractions we actually managed to see (but not the most exciting one).

redesign-berlin_books07

We only saw Alexanderplatz through the train’s window.

redesign-berlin_books08

But we did get to walk through a huge part of the Tiergarten.

redesign-berlin_books09redesign-berlin_books10redesign-berlin_books11redesign-berlin_books12

And another book we bought was actually a gift for our son and it quite enchanted us. It’s a small picture book about a mouse and a hedgehog who live in a garden and grown different plants. It’s printed with water paints on eco-carton, which we condone wholeheartedly, and it’s a lot of fun.

The toys come from our home collection. J has a lot of hedgehogs because of his name and he really loves rodents so the characters in the book were already a good match.

redesign-berlin_books13

Our school German is virtually non-existent but it suffices to read this book.

redesign-berlin_books14

The paper is naturally gray so that white elements have to be printed onto it and it gives the book a pleasant, natural, a little old-fashioned feeling.

redesign-berlin_books15redesign-berlin_books16redesign-berlin_books17redesign-berlin_books18

And that’s it, not the most fruitful trip in this respect but we were spending a lot of time at the conference and the only exciting bookstore we found in the city was closed for a national holiday.

We wrote more about Typo Berlin here, should you be interested for some reason.

redesign-wuthering_primer-01

You might remember our previous posts of literary primers by Jennifer Adams with art by Alison Oliver. Or if you don’t, here’s Dracula and here’s the gem of Pride and Prejudice. As we were visiting our friends, Z&A, we spotted on their bookshelf another book from the series: this time a weather primer based on Bronte’s Wuthering Heights. So, of course, we immediately borrowed it (thanks guys!) to share it with you.

This primer introduces weather-related adjectives with rather idyllic scenes from around Wuthering Heights.

redesign-wuthering_primer-02

A short introduction.

redesign-wuthering_primer-03

redesign-wuthering_primer-06

The doctor travelling through the mists.

redesign-wuthering_primer-04redesign-wuthering_primer-08

Sometimes “sunny” is a word you need to teach your child.

redesign-wuthering_primer-07

But these days this feels like a more useful description.

redesign-wuthering_primer-09

…Aaaaaand puppies.

redesign-wuthering_primer-05

170109-redesign-rok-13

As you may or may not remember, we are big fans of the illustrator Emilia Dziubak and her detailed, colored style, which plays with flat design but goes far beyond it. But her book that we’re sharing with you today, Rok w lesie (A Year in the Woods) is even more than we would have any right to expect. It combines pretty much everything that we love in children’s illustration: details, narration, humor and forest animals.

Each spread of the book shows the same woodland scene with the same animals doing things appropriate for every month. You can see not only the changes in the weather and plants but, most importantly, the different activities in which animals are involved. A huge level of detail means that one can return to the book many, many times, each time finding something new and delightful. The things animals do combine the educational aspect with a lot of good humor. And being very much woods-loving people who try to go for a walk there at least every two days, we find the depiction of the woods charming.

Except for the names of the months, most of the book is wordless, which makes it accessible to younger children (ones who will be able to follow the details, though). The last spread has a list of various animals with a character quirk for each so that one can look for those in the book. It’s actually quite fun to browse through the book multiple times, each time focusing on just one animal and their story.

Book cover.

170109-redesign-rok-03

Spread for January, more appropriate now that we’ve got some snow.

170109-redesign-rok-01

April and December

170109-redesign-rok-02170109-redesign-rok-04

The introduction to individual animals.

170109-redesign-rok-05

And now for some highlights from the lady fox’s story of love and family:

170109-redesign-rok-12

Featuring the cutest baby foxes.

170109-redesign-rok-10170109-redesign-rok-09170109-redesign-rok-07170109-redesign-rok-06

And the badger’s story of eating and sleeping.

170109-redesign-rok-11170109-redesign-rok-08