Tag Archives: design


Today let us share a beautiful book called Under the Ocean by Anouck Boisrobert and Louis Rigaud.

The book is a mastery of paper book engineering, with each spread unfolding in two steps: first to show the situation on the surface of the ocean, where the boat Oceano is traveling. Then, with more impressive sculptural effects, we’re shown what’s underneath it. The 3D extravaganza is paired with beautiful, subtle illustration whose strength lies in just enough detail combined with subtle painterly effects and sensitivity.

It takes you on a journey through the richness of the ocean and while not as directly focused on the ecological message as their previous book about a forest (we’ll show you that one, too), it still manages to convey the beauty and the vulnerability of our oceans.

The cover of the Polish edition.


The boat is starting its journey.


Whales (the minimalist spread offsets nicely more busy spreads around it.)


Seals in the Arctic.



This is probably not exactly like seeing the coral reef but what a beautiful approximation.




Spring always feels like a Jane Austen season to us, maybe because of all those walks in parks she describes. It’s not quite spring yet but it still feels like a good time to share one of our recent Christmas gifts: a box set of all Austen novels (and her juvenile writings) in elegant canvas covers, with neat editorial work to boot. The whole set is published by Penguin Classics and looks great on the shelf.


And we mean “box” literally because the books come in a carton/canvas box with a floral pattern.


All the individual books, with their different patterns. (Admittedly, we’re not always sure why the particular pattern is chosen but they look good.) Notice the interesting, far from obvious color scheme.

Pride and Prejudice, arguably the best of these novels.



As personally we find Austen very re-readable, we’re happy that the next time we read her work it will be this lovely edition.


This comes a few days after St. Valentine’s but hopefully you are still in a romantic mood. This year Experyment Science Center chose magnets as the theme of their yearly evening for adults and we designed the poster and other materials. As previously, participants had a chance to look at love from a scientific point of view.

We continued the designs with the style we have already developed for this event but this year we had a chance to add a man to the illustration. In fact, we had to work on him a little bit because the first version was bearded and we decided we didn’t like that. In the end he seems younger and a bit more, well, science-oriented.

Poster design.





It’s cold and white outside and so we’re sharing a winter-themed design this week. Experyment Science Center invited kids to spend the winter holidays there, learning about Antarctica. We used cool colors and sharp geometry with orange elements to warm things up slightly. Oh, and penguins, of course.





It is white outside and summer seems far away. One way to make it feel closer is to look at books from summer holidays, which, for us, tend to be about Paris. Paris Paname by Sébastien Plassard is a charming picture book based on a simple idea of folding pages. When folded they show one scene in a typical Parisian area and when unfolded – another one, sometimes changed quite subtly. Each illustration includes the thrill of  surprise.

It reminds us of games we used to play as children, in which unfolding a piece of paper changed the illustrated story: it has the same joy and inventiveness, although a much more sophisticated color palette than we tended to employ. If you like your books with a little twist, you might enjoy this one.



In a follow-up for our posts about the Dior exhibition in Paris and the marvellous Dior illustrator Mats Gustafson, let us share the most impressive Christmas gift we got this year: this amazing album of Gustafson’s illustrations for Dior.

Under the most unpretentious title you find dozens of beautiful large-format illustrations created for numerous collections in Gustafson’s signature style: minimalist and charming. He uses watercolors, cut papers and thoroughly impresses us with his talent for capturing fabrics in all their varieties. The dresses and accessories live on the pages. The album is simply a great pleasure to look through and captures well the, strictly speaking unnecessary (but how important!), beauty of fashion and even illustration.

The book out of the sleeve.


Dior’s portrait.


A very Dior-ish, high couture Didoni in the introduction. Other than that, the book uses Gustafson’s handwriting.






With a handwriting like this you don’t need fonts.




This year Poland is celebrating the hundredth anniversary of independence, which it regained in 1918. The celebrations include many events in different cities and we designed an invitation for one of them, a scientific conference in Wrocław that inaugurates the celebrations there. The conference focuses on the people living in the outer regions of the reborn country and how they helped to shape it.

We designed a “100” logotype which is debossed into the cover and equally readable on the cover and on its other side, thanks to the shape of the digits. The whole invitation is kept minimalist, with silver spot color used on the outside and a text in black and red inside. The inside of the cover uses a quote by Ignacy Paderewski, a statesman and musician who serves as a patron of the conference.

Closed invitation, in silver.


The inside of the cover, with Paderewski’s quote.


Open invitation, with information on the conference and its program.