Tag Archives: illustration

A combination of a family event and huge workload made it impossible to come up with a proper post for today so instead let us share this random illustration of a shepherd that you need to lead to his sheep.


(Well, it’s not entirely random. It comes from a semi-recent project we’re sure to share one day.)

re-shop-friendsThis week’s Society6 promo is even better than usually: in addition to free shipping there’s also 5$ off everything. Follow this link if you’re interested in buying some of our awesome stuff. And now onto the proper post.

outbox-foto-15Once we started working on the photos of Escape Out of the Box book we made so many that we decided to split the post into two. Last week we talked about the concept of the book and our layout decisions and today we want to focus more on illustrations. Both layout and illustrations refer to modernism as the dominant style of Gdynia’s architecture (well, at least the interesting parts of it). The best way we could think of to reference modernism was to draw inspiration from Isotype infographics, whose huge fans we are. We started by working out a way of drawing a human figure and the rest came from there. Below is an illustration of various people involved in building a house. It was, in fact, the first illustration that we created.

outbox-foto-21 redesign-outbox-15 outbox-foto-30(Also, possibly you can see us geeking out a little in this illustration of modes of transportation.)

outbox-foto-23 outbox-foto-10outbox-foto-32The Infobox building that the book describes gave us plenty of material to work with. Above the concept of scale is explained with a drawing of a kind of recliner they have in front of the building. Music bands play in the restaurant terrace.

outbox-foto-24We found the technical character of the illustrations quite useful because many of them, in addition to being decorative, served an explanatory function. Above our instruction of making a frotage drawing.

outbox-foto-25 outbox-foto-06 outbox-foto-29To draw portraits we needed to expand the style but we had fun doing that. To the left is a portrait of writer, Stefan Żeromski. Above, Vitruvius.

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There is, in fact, a kind of periscope in Infobox, which you can use to look at Gdynia from above. It’s surprisingly fun.

outbox-foto-27This is the fox from The Little Prince.

outbox-foto-31And a tree-hugger, to go with one of the most difficult illustrations we made: a view of the building with the yard in front of it. It explains the use of various materials in the construction. It’s rather hard to draw materials in a linear, vector convention, believe you me.


redesign-pnp-01Last week we showed you Dracula primer but we bought one more book from this series and this one is probably even more exciting because it’s not only a charming book but also a whole playset – based on Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. So you can teach your child to count horses, villages and pounds a year but you can also make your own Lizzy and Darcy figures and act the whole story (or, you know, a different story, as long as it has Regency clothes and carriages in it). If this is not awesome, we simply don’t know what is.

redesign-pnp-02This is the cover of the book, as it lies in the lovely box which doubles as a ballroom. And here are some spreads from the book. As you can see the main elements of the plot are faithfully recreated, including the finances.

redesign-pnp-05 redesign-pnp-06 redesign-pnp-07You can, of course, buy the book without the extra elements and it’s still quite wonderful but you would be missing out on a lot of fun:

redesign-pnp-03The practical box contains also boards with cutout figures and scenery elements, which you can assemble into the elements of your own PnP story. You can make Jane run off with a valet and raise sheep, why won’t you.

redesign-pnp-04 redesign-pnp-08Not only are the illustrations cute and the very idea highly enjoyable, we actually really like the production quality: the pieces are sufficiently sturdy and should probably survive quite a couple of games (at least we imagine so).


redesign-dracula_primer-01If you think we’re done with showing you gorgeous books… well, you are wrong. We still have bunches of them left, waiting for a day when we feel like spending a part of Sunday photographing them. Yesterday was just such a Sunday and so enjoy this lovely little gem, a counting primer based on Dracula by Jennifer Adams.

It’s a part of a whole series in which classic novels are turned into books for little children (and obsessive designers) with simple yet quirky, charming illustrations. We saw them online a while ago and ogled them hungrily so when we found two (yes, one more is coming) during a book fair, we simply had to get them.

redesign-dracula_primer-06redesign-dracula_primer-05It’s quite lovely how the book turns the rather somber, gothic atmosphere of the novel into something children-friendly but not entirely devoid of the original gloom. And this is, predictably, our favorite spread. Notice the cute use of typography. And the wolves, of course.


The heroes also look very cool:

redesign-dracula_primer-04redesign-dracula_primer-03We’re not showing you all the pages but rest assured that there are more gothic elements like garlic and even coffins. Overall, highly re:commended.

redesign-goldberg-06Experyment Science Center asked us to design a poster for their winter break program for kids. The theme was ecology and it included such activities as various games, recycling workshop and building an eco Goldberg machine. we mostly remember these kinds of machines from childhood cartoons and I think there was a game once which I found quite difficult (and fairly tedious after a while; I’ve got the name on the tip of my tongue but can’t quite remember it). But this is actually a great subject matter for an illustration, more challenging than usually because you have to come up with a series of events that would at least look like a working machine. We also wanted the machine’s effect to seem ecological and that’s how we finally arrived at the diagram for the poster.



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Now, we’re (clearly) no engineers but we hope the sequence of events is clear and so is the welcome outcome.

Speaking of welcome developments, this is another week of free shipping on Society6 if you click this link so if you’re in a mood for our Friends  or Iconic Painters stuff, this is a good chance to get it and save some money.

redesign-fairy_game-02Once upon a time we showed you a sneak peek of an illustration we were working on and promised to show you the rest soon. Soon is clearly today because having received the print version we’re sharing with you a small board game for children that we designed. Our friend designs for a local children’s theater and for Children’s Day celebrations (that’s June, 1st here) they publish a small magazine for kids with activities prepared by designers.

Due to budgetary constraints, this was a pro bono job and these are always tricky in that everyone needs to come up with their own reasons to do or not do stuff for free. We actually have a whole set of conditions that we use to decide. In case you’re interested, here they go. 1) We need to have time to do the project, obviously. This is a basic condition. 2) The project needs to be interesting in graphic terms so we see it as a fun challenge or a chance to try out new ideas. 3) We need creative freedom (if you want to influence the design, that’s great but not free). 4) It can’t be a commercial project that someone is making money off of. 5) We need author’s copies. You’d be surprised how often people ask you to do stuff for free but refuse to give you even one copy of the finished work. (Of course, it helps if a friend asks but that’s not really a condition.)


This time we decided to use the opportunity to play a bit with a certain illustrative style we’d wanted to try out for a while but never had a good project for that. We also decided to treat this as a tribute to one of our favorite pastimes ever and make a very simple board game.

redesign-fairy_game-04The rules are as simple as they come. You go along the way through the woods to get to granny’s hut and every now and then you meet a fairy tale character who makes you go forward, backward or stop for a turn. We came up with a whole host of those characters. They’re all drawn by hand and colored digitally, with a new method we came up with for the project. It turned out quite time-consuming but now we know we would probably return to it some time.

redesign-fairy_game-08Then we assembled all the illustrations into one board, added the rules and the game was ready to play.

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And here are some other activities.



So we were going to get back to Words Matter (and we will next week) but it turns out today’s post is 200th! We wanted to celebrate this fact with special infographics and take the time to thank everyone who’s been with us on this adventure so far. It’s thanks to your involvement that we find motivation to work on the blog, even on the days when we’d rather do something else. Like sleep.

For these statistics we looked through all 199 posts so far and counted many things. Possibly the numbers might be slightly inaccurate in a few places, you’re welcome to check them. We also noticed that we haven’t yet shown you some projects we planned to show so expect a few trips down the memory lane in the future, but mostly expect a lot of new stuff and once again thanks so much for reading us.

Also, it turns out Society6 helped us with a celebratory gift: this week they offer free shipping again so you can buy our posters and other stuff cheaper if you follow this link.





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