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Those of you who’ve been with us for a while will have seen this project but we’re reposting both for the new guests and because of the special occasion: the 25th anniversary of the first emission of Friends, which remains just about the most popular TV show in TV history (we go by impression, not data, here).

For us the show was certainly an important one (well, for one of us; the other one only watched it much later). We celebrated 20 years of Friends with a poster in which we designed an icon for each episode: that was a lot of icon-designing and a lot of Friends-watching and both of those things were so much fun.

poster_friends_wizIf you like the poster, it’s available for sale here.

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And for those who only like a particular season or would like all the seasons separately so that they can cover the entire wall with bigger Friends icons, we also made 10 posters for 10 seasons.

friends-20-redesign-season01Season 1: The One Where They Get a Monkey, a Fussball Table and Rachel (buy here).

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Season 2: The One Where Joey Moves Out and Back In (buy here).

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Season 3: The One with All the Drama with Ross and Rachel (buy here).

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Season 4: The One That Ends in London (buy here).

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Season 5: The One with Monica and Chandler’s Secret (buy here).

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Season 6: The One Where Monica and Chandler Get Engaged (buy here).

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Season 7: The One Where Monica and Chandler Get Married (buy here).

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Season 8: The One with Rachel’s Pregnancy (buy here).

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Season 9: The One Largely about Babies (buy here).

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Season 10: The Last One Where They All Become Adults (Except for Joey) (buy here; all posters can also be bought here).

Original post with a bit more of our Friends story and sentiments here. (And yes, we’re Monica and Chandler fans.)

And on an unrelated note: did you know there’s a Friends Lego set? You probably did. It seems quite fun.

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Sorry for the short hiatus but we’ve had a few deadlines and we took a super short vacation: we spent a weekend in Warsaw. While there, we visited the Type Directors Club exhibition in the Polish-Japanese Academy. The show was really small (it’s held in a lecture room) but we found a few interesting typographic designs that we wanted to share.

Below: Menil Collection Identity by Kristen Chon.

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Complexity and Simplicity by HDU23 from Mainland China. This was lavishly printed with silver on black, which the photo doesn’t show but which really made the poster (this and the strong, clear composition).

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Complexity and Simplicity HDU23 Mainland China

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Pango by Osborne Shiwan. We always like the combination of type and stylish sports photography.

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Julliard School identity (fictional) by Karlo Fuertes Francisco. Type that (almost) sounds.

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This poster by Srishti Jain from Savannah College of Art and Design immediately drew attention.

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And finally some strong-as-always type posters by Paula Scher for Shakespeare in the Park. This only seems to get better with time.

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If you in the area, drop by the exhibition and see for yourselves; it’s a short but interesting stop.

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Almost exactly 50 years ago, on the 20th of July 1969, man first landed on the Moon. In the heat of the space race president John F. Kennedy declared that Americans would land on the Moon by the end of 1960s, and what do you know, they did*.

A giant rocket Saturn V was constructed, capable of carrying space ship Apollo 11 to the Moon. We are celebrating the 50th anniversary of this momentous moment with a poster illustrating Saturn V.

The poster is available in our store.

(* Some people might still disagree but we don’t hold with conspiracy theories and are all the happier for it.)

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This year for its holiday program Experyment Science Center focuses on space travel and flying. We were asked to design a poster which would combine this theme with play and experiments. When we told them what we wanted to do, we were given three boxes of fun stuff: science toys, microscope parts, lab equipment, a model of the solar system. We also raided our son’s room for toys and then constructed a rocket of all those bits and pieces we chose.

Projects like this are awesome for reminding us that design is more than being stuck to the computer screen and can be fun in more than one way.

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The flashlights-as-rocket-engines might be our favorite part.

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This year marks 100 years of the establishment of the Bauhaus school of design and we (along with the rest of the world) are celebrating the occasion with a poster.

Bauhaus is one of the most recognizable names and most important institutions in the history of design and particularly modernist design which – as you may know or not – is very much what we love. So working on the poster was pure (math-tinted) pleasure.

We drew several iconic Bauhaus designs isometrically (celebrating Bauhaus artists’ – and ours – fondness for isometry) and arranged them into a number 100.

You can buy the poster on the Bazaar or Society6.

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Our version of the logo for the centennial.

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This detail includes Wassily Chair by Marcel Breuer, Marianne Brandt’s tea infuser and pot by Wolfgang Rossger & Friedrich Marby.

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This detail includes furniture from Gropius’ office and nesting tables by Josef Albers.

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This might be our favorite piece of Bauhaus design: chessboard by Josef Hartwig.

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Happy Bauhaus 100!

Last week we took J to an exhibition in Sopot that shows three Japanese poster designers. He didn’t seem much awed by those masters but we were, and so we’re sharing with you some highlights. (Note: the gallery didn’t allow for photos in the exhibition so all the images are internet-derived.)

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We were definitely most impressed by Ikko Tanaka, who started his long career in Tokyo and worked for many institutions and corporations. We knew some of his work, mostly the posters based on illustrations of  faces, but seeing many posters displayed together allowed us to admire the style he developed. He combined modernist love for geometricization with a sensitivity to the Japanese tradition of woodcut and illustration. He also managed to make these posters very decorative with the choice of color and with a really good sense of how to use simplification to create attractive forms.

Tanaka’s famous face posters: on the left the most well-known one. These show his mastery of simple forms and colors.

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Tanaka’s geometricized natural forms form the possibly most accessible part of his work.

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The second designer, Yusaku Kamekura, is probably the most revered one, and slightly older than the other two. He also combined Western inspirations with Japanese tradition but in a less consistent way: he used different techniques, geometric, painterly, even photographic. He’s most famous work is probably that related to the 1964 Tokyo Olympics.

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There is something very decorative and ornamental about many of Kamekura’s posters.

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And the third one, Shigeo Fukuda, differs a bit. He didn’t seem that inspired by either modernism nor Japanese traditional art but instead sought surrealist metaphors and visual illusions. While we like his ideas, the style speaks to us the least, reminding us of some later Polish poster designers we don’t necessarily enjoy as much.

Fukuda returned many times to the same motifs, like the folded piece of paper…

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…or the most charming one, an Escherian dachshund.

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In addition to the very interesting poster exhibition, the gallery also held two more typically art exhibitions: one of Polish painting (mostly from 19th and early 20th century) and one of contemporary art inspired by a Polish modernist sculptor, Katarzyna Kobro. These excited our son more, particularly the projector used for one of the modern exhibits.

A most impressive painting by Weiss, showing school girls on a walk in Kraków. We were awed by the subtle color palette and the photographic composition, particularly that not all of Weiss’s work is equally exiciting.

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Speaking of dachshunds (?), a charming pastel sketch by one of our favorites, Stanisław Wyspiański.

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A variation on a medieval illumination turned into a fairy tale by Zbigniew Waliszewski (“The Hunt”).

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From the modern art exhibition something right up our valley, a typographic installation by Aurelia Mandziuk-Zajączkowska. Letterforms inspired by Polish modernism.

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And this is Kobro’s work, a nude.

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Sorry for the short hiatus, guys, but not only did Carrie wipe us out a little – we’re also working on our new studio website and it’s a huge enterprise. We’ll share the progress as we go on, especially the new project photos.

In the meantime we wanted to show you a resurrection of sorts of one of our minimalist Disney posters: the cover for a Belgian lifestyle magazine Knack Weekend. We were asked for the Pinocchio design for the cover because it fit the theme of the issue, about the lies people tell, and we were happy to cooperate. Pinocchio gained a new background and some international exposure.

The original Pinocchio poster.

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The whole series (buyable here)

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180702-redesign-randomness_thesis And a little different find: we discovered that our Freud cover from the Words Matter series made it to the academia: it is carefully analyzed in a thesis on randomness in typography by Anders Larsson, which you can find here (we’re on pages 28-31 but read the whole thesis).