Archive

Tag Archives: typography

tdc-pjatk-1

Sorry for the short hiatus but we’ve had a few deadlines and we took a super short vacation: we spent a weekend in Warsaw. While there, we visited the Type Directors Club exhibition in the Polish-Japanese Academy. The show was really small (it’s held in a lecture room) but we found a few interesting typographic designs that we wanted to share.

Below: Menil Collection Identity by Kristen Chon.

Menil-Collection-Identity-by-Kristen-Chon

Menil-Collection-Identity-by-Kristen-Chon2

Complexity and Simplicity by HDU23 from Mainland China. This was lavishly printed with silver on black, which the photo doesn’t show but which really made the poster (this and the strong, clear composition).

Complexity and Simplicity HDU23 Mainland China2

Complexity and Simplicity HDU23 Mainland China

Complexity-and-Simplicity-HDU23-Mainland-China3

Pango by Osborne Shiwan. We always like the combination of type and stylish sports photography.

Pango-by-Osborne-Shiwan

Julliard School identity (fictional) by Karlo Fuertes Francisco. Type that (almost) sounds.

julliard-school-by-Karlo-Fuertes-Francisco

This poster by Srishti Jain from Savannah College of Art and Design immediately drew attention.

Srishti-Jain-from-Sohee-Kwan-at-Savannah-College-of-Art-and-Design

And finally some strong-as-always type posters by Paula Scher for Shakespeare in the Park. This only seems to get better with time.

Paula-Scher-Shakespeare-in-the-Park-Pentagram

If you in the area, drop by the exhibition and see for yourselves; it’s a short but interesting stop.

Advertisements

e-36

Today it’s E’s birthday, so: Happy Birthday to Her!

redesign-castle-book-inst1

A few months ago we finished a book  for the Malbork Castle Museum.

The Malbork Castle is a world-famous heritage place, a 13th century castle built by the Teutonic Order (Malbork was then called Marienburg if that tells you more). It is a truly impressive historic monument well-worth visiting. The book is a scientific study of life in the castle at the time when the Teutonic Order lived there. It talks not only of politics and economy but also of minutiae of everyday functioning of this huge establishment.

The book’s design had to be sober not to distract from the academic content. Mainly, we had to make the information aesthetic and legible. We chose to use a golden-brown spot color for all the special texts in the book and for archival photographs which are printed in gold and black. The cover contains a golden-brown photo of the castle and the title is hotstamped in silver.

redesign-castle-book-inst2redesign-castle-book-inst3

We will share more photos of the book later but for now they’re not properly edited so check back soon.

redesign-woodstock50-inst1

50 years ago in Woodstock a legendary music festival took place and some of the most exciting artists of the time performed. We always loved the music of the time and the very myth of Woodstock, with its celebration of love and peace and rock’n’roll, and we’re celebrating the anniversary with a poster.

redesign-woodstock50-inst2

redesign-pixies-doolittle-gouge-gun-03

(First of all, this post is so late – sorry about that. Our son is back to preschool and this means back to the onslaught of all sorts of cold viruses like you wouldn’t believe. But we’re powering through.)

A long time ago we started Project Doolittle: both a tribute to the Pixies’ great album and an experiment in tangible type. By the time we finished the project, that is designed all 15 covers for all the songs, it is (already a bit past) the 30th anniversary of the release of Doolittle so the project becomes even more of a celebration of this record.

redesign-pixies-doolittle-all

Each cover is a different attempt at tangible typography: letters made of various materials, crafted by hand, sometimes designed by us and sometimes based on existing typefaces. We didn’t mainly focus on the connection between the material and the song, going more for an impressionistic, poetic if you will, relation between them (though in some cases the connection is more obvious than in others). We wanted to experiment with 3D typography to see how much using actual, physical objects rather than a computer adds to typographic designs.

This project started as one of our very first forays into handmade type and in the period between its beginning and ending we managed to do quite a few such projects (including a PhD thesis) but we are happy that we chose to return to this series and finished it because it’s one of those string-free projects that are very fun to work at. Hope you enjoy it as well.

redesign-pixies-doolittle-wave-hey-04redesign-pixies-doolittle-hey-25redesign-pixies-doolittle-monkey-herecomes-05redesign-pixies-doolittle-herecomes-01redesign-pixies-doolittle-monkey-08redesign-pixies-doolittle-wave-19redesign-pixies-doolittle-mygun-28redesign-pixies-doolittle-mygun-27redesign-pixies-doolittle-mygun-26redesign-pixies-doolittle-mrgrieves-23redesign-pixies-doolittle-mrgrieves-02redesign-pixies-doolittle-mrgrieves-22redesign-pixies-doolittle-gouge-14redesign-pixies-doolittle-gouge-13redesign-pixies-doolittle-silver-16redesign-pixies-doolittle-silver-15redesign-pixies-doolittle-no13-10redesign-pixies-doolittle-no13-09redesign-pixies-doolittle-tame-18redesign-pixies-doolittle-tame-17redesign-pixies-doolittle-ibleed-11redesign-pixies-doolittle-ibleed-12redesign-pixies-doolittle-crackity-29redesign-pixies-doolittle-crackity-30redesign-pixies-doolittle-dead-07redesign-pixies-doolittle-dead-06redesign-pixies-doolittle-debaser-21redesign-pixies-doolittle-debaser-24

 

redesign-pixies-debaser-detail-5

And so we come to the final Project Doolittle cover, this one for possibly our favorite song from the album: “Debaser.”

The title is relatively short, which always allows for a more complicated (and in this case more expensive) material than the longer titles. In fact, we had some discussions about what to use for this one, one of us squeamishly opposed to meat typography. We’re not exactly vegetarian (yet, anyway) but we don’t like preparing meat ourselves and we wondered if this wouldn’t be too much to handle. However, in the end it proved, well, manageable (and a rather delicious dinner because we don’t like wasting food).

Fair warning: if you don’t like looking at close-ups of meat, you might want to skip some of the images.

redesign-pixies-debaser-frontredesign-pixies-debaser-redesign

Back cover.

redesign-pixies-debaser-back

redesign-pixies-debaser-detail-6redesign-pixies-debaser-detail-1redesign-pixies-debaser-detail-2redesign-pixies-debaser-detail-4redesign-pixies-debaser-detail-3redesign-pixies-debaser-detail-7

So this ends “Project Doolittle”: despite a longish break between two halves of the project, in the end we managed to do all the covers. Next week we’ll show you all of them together, just in time to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the album’s release (we hope so anyway, because whenever we promise to do something on time, we tend to be late).

redesign-pixies-there-goes-my-gun-detail1

We’ve reached homestretch of Project Doolittle: today last but one design for “There Goes My Gun.” (Also, we know nothing about sports.)

For a metallic effect the song suggested to us, we chose to play with aluminum foil. It is one of materials we like to return to every now and then because of how flexible it is. We used the foil in three different ways to render letters, going from more three-dimensional to deconstructed.

redesign-pixies-there-goes-my-gun-mockupredesign-pixies-there-goes-my-gun-frontredesign-pixies-there-goes-my-gun-backredesign-pixies-there-goes-my-gun-detail2redesign-pixies-there-goes-my-gun-detail3

One to go! Homestretch (or not)!