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We spent the last week photographing some of the recent(ish) work because we’ve got a crazy backlog of unphotographed designs (we’re really bad at keeping up with this stuff…). Now we’re finishing editing some of those photos and we’ll be showing them to you in the coming weeks (and also adding them to the website, finally).

Today enjoy this sneak peek of a project we did for the Castle Museum in Malbork. It is a double-sided exhibition poster which, after folding, works as a dust jacket for the book published for the occasion. (If it’s not clear, it will become so once we show you the book itself.) The title in Latin means “Wisdom built a house for itself” as the exhibition showed the history of the Teutonic Order in its headquarters: Malbork. The poster is printed in silver and black. The exhibition identity and logo (the cool gothic S) by Maciej Bychowski.

re-commendations-impulseOn December we skipped recommending stuff to you because Christmas and work took up all of our time anyway. But this month we’re back with another show that we think you might like and that kept us excited this month.

Impulse (season 1 and 2)

What is it? A show by YouTube Red tells a story of Henry, a teenage girl with a superpower: she teleports. This is not your run-of-the-mill superhero story, though. It’s also not a teen drama, not really.

Why we love it? It’s a surprisingly mature and original story: not so much a story for teenagers as about them. It captures well the frustratingly bad choices teenagers make. It also sets itself an ambitious task of examining the consequences of sexual trauma and of unconventional parenting. And we truly love Henry’s sidekicks, Jenna and Townes, who are shown with warmth and sensitivity.

Visually speaking, the tone is confidently bleak and cold, Henry’s town consistently uninviting. Everyone wears winter clothes, which we appreciate because Hollywood notoriously ignores low temperatures, having people dressed in T-shirts in winter. We could live without the shaky camera, though.

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We did flake a little at the beginning of the year (sorry!) but December exhausted us completely. We’re back! We’re back with another lovely book, this time by Isabella Bunnel. The book is called Disappearing Acts and it shows endagered animals of different habitats in lovely, painted search-and-find spreads.

Each spread has a unique color scheme, a richness of details and patterns and a sad message: among the variety of well-painted animals from a different terrain, the reader is asked to find some which are literally disappearing.

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Further pages describe the animals and explain the reasons for their endangered status (spoiler alert: it’s mostly environmental damage and loss of habitats).

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The activity part is easy – our four-year-old found all the animals fast – but the lovely, detailed illustrations still invite careful study. The book is educational, too, with an important message. It manages to match the kind of activity to the theme well (the animals are difficult to find because they are fewer and fewer – makes sense). And, most of all, the painting style is so charming and confident.

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May you have wonderful Christmas time and may it fill you with peace and joy!

Best Christmas wishes from re:design

(Also, we know we’re late this year but a combination of overwork and cold made these Christmas preparations intense and stressful and something had to give. Still, the wishes are a bit more intense for every hour they are late. XOXO!)

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Even though most of us are still a little bit sick, we had an intense weekend, which included cleaning, ornament making and, most importantly, card making. It’s so late in the season and the post office is sure to bring the print version to people some time for Easter but at least we’re doing it (and it’s fun). (Also, we mostly send it online so it will be on time.)

In this little preview of our process you can see us cutting elements of the card out (almost all of us – we don’t fully trust our one-year-old with sharp tools yet). Come back soon for the awesome (hopefully awesome?) finished version.

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And how far along are you with your seasonal preparations? It’s a mess, amirite?

 

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Another trip to the library brought us (and J) another lovely book by Britta Teckentrup. (The previous one is here.) This time we returned with Tree, which tells the story of seasons through a tree in a forest and the animals that live within or near it. The book has a poem commenting on the seasonal changes but it’s really the illustrated part that grabs your attention. It has lovely depictions of animals in their yearly cycle (foxes are, unsurprisingly, our favorites) and a generous use of die-cuts, which make the book more playful. But we are, perhaps, most impressed with the color palettes used for every season (and particularly autumn).

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The owl in its hollow is always in the centre of the tree – and of the book – while the forest around it changes. (Below the minimalist, and lovely, endpaper.)

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Winter snowy mystery (wonder if we’re going to get it this year).

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Spring lushness (our personal favorite real-life season).

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Summer night with its richness of life.

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The beautiful autumn.

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And here we go again.

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As we enter the season of the year that we tend to unreasonably grumble about (it’s cold and it’s gray, guys), this reminder of the beauty of every season comes as very welcome.