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We had the pleasure of designing a simple identity for a project of Integralia Foundation called doradza.my (which translates something like we.advise). The foundation aims to make it easier for disabled people to re-join the job market and this particular project does it by offering educational online meetings. The logo combines a speech bubble with a wi-fi symbol. Once the identity was ready, we designed some materials based on it, the most exciting of which is a notebook.

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Because the identity uses purple and red the notebook is printed only with these two Pantone colors. Inside in addition to writing space the owner will find information about searching for a job, helpful hints and statistics.

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As you might perhaps know we greatly enjoy designing infographics, graphs and such elements so this was quite a lot of fun but this project also meant that we got to focus more on production values than is often possible. Small color details of the notebook, together with the smooth, cream paper, make for an elegant, inviting feel. The bookmark, rubber band and thread are all red to offset the purple cover.

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And the cover has red hotstamping, making for a minimalist look. By the way, we are fans of hotstamping but actually rarely have a chance to work with it.

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If you’ve been following us for a while you might have noticed that we are huge fans of Marianna Oklejak, an illustrator whose style mixes freshness of children’s drawings and adult humor. Every now and then we share her work and time has come to show you our newest acquisition (well, we got it for Christmas but it still counts as new).

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This is a special book in that Oklejak is for a change not illustrating someone else’s work but doing that whole illustrator-as-author thing. And she’s great at it! She draws inspiration from Polish folk art and reinterprets its motifs.

Polish folk art is quite rich and can be visually exciting. Every region had its motifs, color schemes and ornaments, as well as unique techniques of decorating things. This tradition withered to a large extent when people got more interested in the “modern”, industrial design. Folk art got relegated to decorating tourist souvenirs and became viewed as embarrassing. But it’s been having a sort of renaissance now that many designers, particularly interior designers and such, began to draw inspiration from the traditional motifs in a modern way (which also gets trashy sometimes, but often it works amazingly).

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Oklejak’s book uses folk motifs as elements of her fun compositions but adds an educational element. The spread above simply shows various types of local headgear (and only the one with peacock feathers is at all recognizable these days).

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This awesome spread uses stripes from traditional skirts as elements of a landscape full of fields (which is also a typical Polish landscape so that works great).

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Two different folk dance spreads! Do they play Polish folk? (Hopefully not, it’s not great.)

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Traditional lace tablecloths as autumn clouds.

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And paper doilies as snowflakes.

We’re happy that the book has already won an Ibby award because in addition to the fairly obvious educational value it has so much more: a sort of quirky atmosphere that manages to combine tradition with a more modern feel and to celebrate local identity.

 

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Today a small sneak peek of a project we’re currently working on (because we really need to be working on it right now rather than posting). This might seem a little cryptic for now but it will become quite clear once we share the finished design in March (or so).

In other news, though, be sure to enjoy the extra day! We always feel an extra day is a definite cause for celebration (even if we won’t necessarily manage to do anything special today ourselves).

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Eli, no! is a delightful little book by Katie Kirk. We found it a long time ago online when it was still waiting to be published and waited impatiently for the book that we could buy. It’s a story of a dog named Eli and all the things he does that make his owners scream the title of the book and it will ring quite true to any dog owners out there.

The book is illustrated in a simple vector style with bold colors and unobtrusive typography, which results in a fun, modern look. But its greatest appeal lies in how each spread reflects an observation of some typical dog behavior – and how well these are translated into the book medium.

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(Is this the Louvre in the background? That would be quite awesome. But it’s certainly an awesome squirrel.)

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The next two are possibly my favorite spreads, one with food, one with letters:

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And a heartwarming conclusion (spoiler, I guess):

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So, did you have a good St Valentine’s Day? We had some tiny colorful cake, it was pretty good but we’re all for conventional, they-may-even-be-sappy holiday celebrations. We get if it’s not your thing, though.

Anyway, our Valentine-related project this year was a poster for Experyment Science Centre. Like last year, they prepared an evening of activities for adults, explaining love phenomena in scientific terms. We decided to create a poster that would form a series with the last one so once again we started with a romantic lady, this time surrounded by particles. Then we followed the client’s suggestion (which was a very good one) to add an android that would refer to the theme of the lecture and so the whole illustration got a sort of retro sci-fi character, which we’re very happy with.

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We had a different post in work but it turns out it’s our fifth anniversary with the blog and so we thought we’d take a moment to thank you for dropping by, reading, liking and commenting. We appreciate every single sign of interest. In fact, that’s what keeps us going, particularly now that our five-month-old has increasing demands on our time. But the blog is such an important part of our routine that we do and will make time for it as well. As a matter of fact, we have quite a few interesting side projects going that we will be sharing later this year, not to mention work stuff and all the books from our bookshelf that we want to praise.

So, not to bore you: thanks for your visits and keep coming back!

And in case you’re new(er) here, here’s a handy list of our favorite entertainments posts that we did during these five years.

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At the end of last year we designed the second volume of recipes from the cooking show Atelier of Taste, a brainchild of Jola Słoma and Mirek Trymbulak (here‘s volume one, by the way; it’s been a while since then). Jola and Mirek are fashion designers and chefs, now cooking only vegan and gluten-free meals, and the have gathered new 108 recipes to share with their viewers.

We couldn’t be happier with the assignment: not only are cookbooks always a fantastic thing to design but also we could go (a little bit) wild with special features and so the book has die-cuts and metallic spot colors.

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The spot color we used for the title page visible through the hole in the cover and for chapter title pages is one of those rarer metallic Pantones of a lovely magenta hue. We chose it because the identity of the show uses purple (and orange; we used mostly orange in the previous book) – and also because it’s quite striking. Since magenta is also used extensively on the show’s set, it appears in most photos and so the whole book gains a unified (purple) look. (All the photos used in the book are from the show’s archive.)

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Playing with special print methods is always fun but, of course, the real challenge in designing a cookbook – and so many other books – is the organization of information. Incidentally, it’s also one of our favorite things ever (because we’re loads of fun to hang out with).

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In addition to the list of ingredients and instructions, each recipe has a short introduction from the authors, time required for preparations, number of resulting portions and nutritional value. We used icons for these sections and, more excitingly, we also designed an icon for each type of dish, such as salad, cake, drink etc. (a total of 19 icons, not all of them quite easy to come up with). We used them by the page numbers and on chapter title pages (and on the contents pages, as shown below).

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Chapter intros consist of two spreads, one with a mosaic of photos and another, purple one with a short introduction. Thanks to the use of the same circular die-cut as on the cover, the two spreads are combined.

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We often say that this or that project was so much fun – and it’s true because we love a lot of things about our job – but few projects are as much fun as this one: a book, with special printing techniques and a whole lot of information to organize (and yes, spiral binding).

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