A (long) while ago we started one of our favorite series of just-for-fun designs with 15 posters that condensed TV shows into three icons so that you could guess or not what the given show was. It looked like this:

redesign-iconic_tv-15

and you can find the original post here.

In the meantime we have watched some more TV and designed (for now) three more posters to guess. This time it’s for three real classics and, to be precise, we only watched two of these recently (and we really hope you know us well enough by now to know which we did not spend hours and hours watching, not since we were ten anyway). So, for your guessing pleasure (answers underneath, should you need them):

1.

redesign-iconic_tv-17

2.

redesign-iconic_tv-16

3.

redesign-iconic_tv-18

As with all the previous posters, you can buy your own copy in our stores here and here. We’ll be also adding other things (like phone cases and stuff later).

And here are the answers (even though you probably know by now):

1. Friday Night Lights

2. Baywatch

3. Gilmore Girls

redesign-ateliersmaku-01

Just in time for Christmas and at a cost of just a few sleepless nights we helped Słoma&Trymbulak publish a new vegan and gluten-free cookbook (or, you know, the recipes are vegan and gluten-free anyway). It was an intense process but we’re happy with the result: we got to play with some cool options, like die-cut holes and metallic magenta.

Many, many more images coming up once we’ve edited them.

re-sherlock_game-01

Today we thought we would show you a slightly different side of us. You might have already noticed – or not – but we are huge fans of boardgames. We have a decent collection and we enjoy particularly games with a story. However, these are not always great design-wise. We thought every now and then we might show you some of the games we find interesting in this aspect and share our love for the material side of gaming.

Because the weather makes us think of all things foggy and gloomy we are starting with Sherlock Holmes: Consulting Detective. This is a pretty unusual game in that it’s a set of ten puzzles to solve and once you’ve solved them, you’re more or less done. However, we really love Sherlock Holmes and we don’t have all that much time for gaming (truth be told, we’ve finished two cases so far and we’ve had this game for a few years) so we bought the game despite its limited replayability.

re-sherlock_game-02

The box (which is only average, compared to some other elements) contains ten booklets with case studies, a map of London and two cool ideas: ten copies of The Times and a directory of various London addresses. Even though we’re not absolutely delighted with everything about the design of the game, particularly with some typographic choices, overall we find it climactic and entertaining.

re-sherlock_game-03re-sherlock_game-14

Each case is described in its own booklet, loosely stylized to an old look through stamps, ornaments and old paper texture. We’re generally not huge fans of this style (though we do like the wallpaper at the beginning) but we get why game designers do this. In fact, it’s not easy to come up with a reasonable alternative for a game like this one.

re-sherlock_game-06

You use the map of London in order to decide where to go next. The map has Scary Holmes (I’m assuming it’s not Jack the Ripper, much as he looks it) in the corner.

re-sherlock_game-10

(It also has negative kerning in the street names and I’m not sure about the sans serif but I like the gloomy colors offset by pink.)

re-sherlock_game-04re-sherlock_game-09

But it’s the other two elements that make the game so exciting and immersive. The directory list all the people that appear in the cases and many practical places like restaurants and tobacco makers and it’s your decision who’s relevant to the case and who you’ll visit. It also has very cool initials.

re-sherlock_game-05

re-sherlock_game-07

And finally our favorite element: The Times for each day a case is being solved, with information about various relevant and irrelevant events. As if that wasn’t cool enough, the information from the newspapers adds up so that you might need a side note from day one to solve case number four. That’s pretty awesome – and slightly overwhelming.

re-sherlock_game-08

The newspaper is also hands down the best-designed piece of the game (and one of the best of all the games that we own). It’s also printed on paper that’s nice to handle.

re-sherlock_game-13re-sherlock_game-12

If this post made you want to play the game, you’ll be absolutely right to do so, by the way.

Peace for Paris symbol by Jean Jullien.

It felt inappropriate to write any other post. Our thoughts are with Paris and its people.

The image by Jean Jullien. It’s a good example of how design, though it doesn’t really change the world, can sometimes help people unite.

A combination of a family event and huge workload made it impossible to come up with a proper post for today so instead let us share this random illustration of a shepherd that you need to lead to his sheep.

151109-redesign-baca

(Well, it’s not entirely random. It comes from a semi-recent project we’re sure to share one day.)

re-shop-friendsThis week’s Society6 promo is even better than usually: in addition to free shipping there’s also 5$ off everything. Follow this link if you’re interested in buying some of our awesome stuff. And now onto the proper post.

outbox-foto-15Once we started working on the photos of Escape Out of the Box book we made so many that we decided to split the post into two. Last week we talked about the concept of the book and our layout decisions and today we want to focus more on illustrations. Both layout and illustrations refer to modernism as the dominant style of Gdynia’s architecture (well, at least the interesting parts of it). The best way we could think of to reference modernism was to draw inspiration from Isotype infographics, whose huge fans we are. We started by working out a way of drawing a human figure and the rest came from there. Below is an illustration of various people involved in building a house. It was, in fact, the first illustration that we created.

outbox-foto-21 redesign-outbox-15 outbox-foto-30(Also, possibly you can see us geeking out a little in this illustration of modes of transportation.)

outbox-foto-23 outbox-foto-10outbox-foto-32The Infobox building that the book describes gave us plenty of material to work with. Above the concept of scale is explained with a drawing of a kind of recliner they have in front of the building. Music bands play in the restaurant terrace.

outbox-foto-24We found the technical character of the illustrations quite useful because many of them, in addition to being decorative, served an explanatory function. Above our instruction of making a frotage drawing.

outbox-foto-25 outbox-foto-06 outbox-foto-29To draw portraits we needed to expand the style but we had fun doing that. To the left is a portrait of writer, Stefan Żeromski. Above, Vitruvius.

outbox-foto-05 outbox-foto-09

There is, in fact, a kind of periscope in Infobox, which you can use to look at Gdynia from above. It’s surprisingly fun.

outbox-foto-27This is the fox from The Little Prince.

outbox-foto-31And a tree-hugger, to go with one of the most difficult illustrations we made: a view of the building with the yard in front of it. It explains the use of various materials in the construction. It’s rather hard to draw materials in a linear, vector convention, believe you me.

outbox-foto-28outbox-foto-17

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 20,625 other followers