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In what has become a bit of a tradition, this year again we celebrate St. Valentine’s by sharing the poster we did for Experyment Science Center. The poster is an invitation for an adults’ evening where, among other attractions, experts try to explain love in scientific terms. This year’s theme included the chemistry of love and how different chemicals are responsible for the emotions that we feel.

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In what has become a trademark for this series we again chose to illustrate a lovely lady but this time we focused on perfume and the love compound and not so much on her science-related look. We chose intense color scale with hot pinks offset by aquas.

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So please enjoy your St. Valentine’s Day tomorrow, whether celebrating it with your loved ones or just doing something fun for yourselves. We are convinced that any holiday is worth celebrating, whether in its spirit or differently – that’s up to you.

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You might remember our previous posts of literary primers by Jennifer Adams with art by Alison Oliver. Or if you don’t, here’s Dracula and here’s the gem of Pride and Prejudice. As we were visiting our friends, Z&A, we spotted on their bookshelf another book from the series: this time a weather primer based on Bronte’s Wuthering Heights. So, of course, we immediately borrowed it (thanks guys!) to share it with you.

This primer introduces weather-related adjectives with rather idyllic scenes from around Wuthering Heights.

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A short introduction.

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The doctor travelling through the mists.

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Sometimes “sunny” is a word you need to teach your child.

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But these days this feels like a more useful description.

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…Aaaaaand puppies.

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One of our latest works, not yet in our hands, is a post-exhibition catalog (always a favorite kind of job) Fête Funèbre. Last week we were approving dust jacket printouts in the printing house and so today we can share teaser photos of the extremely cool hotstamping that they have. We will show you the rest of the catalog – including, well, its interior – once we get our copies but that may be a while yet.

Also, did you know that visiting a printing house can be sort of exciting (if not done too often when it becomes a bother)?

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We’ve been gifted this week with a bit of snow, the pretty kind which covers everything in white glory (before it turns to gray sludge that will occupy the city till April, that is). As snow is only enjoyable for a short time when it first falls, we took the opportunity to bring J to the woods so he could brave the snowdrifts – which he did.

Also, as his obsession with Ikea rats does not seem to diminish, he demanded that we build him a snow rat – which we obediently did. So this week instead of a proper design job, please enjoy our sculptural efforts.

As you well know, these pseudo-lifestyle posts are not what this blog is really about – so no worries – but some weeks you find more creative outlets in building the snowrat than in proper design work and it seemed only appropriate to document that.

It is one well-pleased, well-fed snowrat.

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As you may or may not remember, we are big fans of the illustrator Emilia Dziubak and her detailed, colored style, which plays with flat design but goes far beyond it. But her book that we’re sharing with you today, Rok w lesie (A Year in the Woods) is even more than we would have any right to expect. It combines pretty much everything that we love in children’s illustration: details, narration, humor and forest animals.

Each spread of the book shows the same woodland scene with the same animals doing things appropriate for every month. You can see not only the changes in the weather and plants but, most importantly, the different activities in which animals are involved. A huge level of detail means that one can return to the book many, many times, each time finding something new and delightful. The things animals do combine the educational aspect with a lot of good humor. And being very much woods-loving people who try to go for a walk there at least every two days, we find the depiction of the woods charming.

Except for the names of the months, most of the book is wordless, which makes it accessible to younger children (ones who will be able to follow the details, though). The last spread has a list of various animals with a character quirk for each so that one can look for those in the book. It’s actually quite fun to browse through the book multiple times, each time focusing on just one animal and their story.

Book cover.

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Spread for January, more appropriate now that we’ve got some snow.

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April and December

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The introduction to individual animals.

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And now for some highlights from the lady fox’s story of love and family:

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Featuring the cutest baby foxes.

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And the badger’s story of eating and sleeping.

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