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We’re in the middle of a redecoration project right now and we spent too much of Sunday with hammers and screwdrivers to finish a larger post. We did manage to finish the illustration above though and it’s brand new (just like our cupboard) so enjoy that for now.

Our project Iconic TV Posters happened a while ago (here and then here) and since then we’ve been watching some new shows so it’s only right to broaden the list every now and then. Today we add a show for your guessing pleasure (assuming you even heard of it). It’s just finished its second season and it remains a weird and charming (if sometimes darkish) delight that so far we’ve had no success in recommending to our friends. So, do you know the show as encapsulated in these three icons?

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We’ll put the answer in the comments and if, like us, you appreciate an original thought in the creation of a show, give it a try.

And if you like the poster, as usual we added it to our stores on Society6 and bza.

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Yesterday we visited our friends for a housewarming party and so we were faced with choosing a gift. This is normally a fairly standard procedure for this kind of event but T&D are both architects of very defined and refined tastes and we (rightly) expected that their apartment would be their big project. So we didn’t want to bring them either anything furniture-related, which they would probably never use, or anything tepid like a plant but instead we designed a poster for the occasion. Even if they wouldn’t want to put it up (which we don’t really expect them to) at least they would get something personal and unique.

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In our design we were inspired by a tradition of small tapestries with embroidered home-related sayings and pieces of wisdom to hang on the wall, which exist in folk tradition (and look something like this). You can still find them in some houses as a kind of jokey wall decoration. As we’re don’t really know too many folk sayings and we wanted something a little weird we found a slogan online. We’d never heard it before and can’t vouch for its authenticity but we liked its surreal quality. It says in rough translation “A house is rich not in its cornerstones but in dumplings”, which I could try to interpret (it makes a tiny little bit more sense in Polish, possibly) but we just kept it very literal. We used illustrations that referred to both building a house and cooking dumplings and arranged the slogan in modernist letters that our friends happen to love.

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Even though we’ll fully understand if the poster doesn’t make it to a wall because they’d probably had every decorative element planned before the they set foot in the apartment, at least our friends were touched and surprised to get this bit of our work.

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First of all, sorry for the missed update. It was on the top of our priorities for the whole week but then something always bumped it down (and mostly it was our son who tends to bump things around on daily basis). Anyways, here we go.

We like to take holidays in May before the holiday season starts for good because it’s (slightly) less crowded and because we always tell ourselves that we’ll take another short holiday in September (and then we don’t). But, clearly, this year we’re skipping the whole holiday thing altogether so instead we will at least talk about a design issue concerning our favorite travel destination ever, which is, you guessed it, Paris.

This year the publications for tourists by The Paris Convention and Visitors Bureau have been rebranded by studio Graphéine. The rebranding comes with a new logo (so, so much better than the old one) – a minimalist typographic design which brilliantly utilizes the Eiffel tower.

It’s very clear that while it’s hard to imagine Paris’ logo without the tower it’s almost equally hard to imagine the tower done right. Graphéine designers gave it a lot of thought: you can read about it in their article about the project (we link to it at the end). We definitely feel they made all the right choices: they did not give up on the most recognizable symbol of the city but they simplified it to the point of abstraction, which way of thinking is close to our hearts. Together the letters create

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The logo is quite awesome but the additional perk of designing for a Paris-based institution is what a great photo you can take of the building signage.

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In addition to the logo the studio also designed various publications, the most impressive of which are the covers of maps and other informative materials based on simple, colorful illustrations. Some of the illustrations allude to specific nationalities (French and British mostly) though we’re not sure if it’s true for all of them.

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A jazzy cover for the informative magazine about what’s happening in Paris.

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The Japanese cover is particularly lovely and it demonstrates well what a nice color palette was chosen.

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The design of Paris Pass, which seems to introduce additional elements (and tone) to the rebranding.

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Here is the link to Graphéine’s presentation of their work with many more images. This project takes on a lovely but potentially difficult topic and deals with it in an effective and charming manner. Much as we love it, it makes us even more Paris-sick because we’d love to get our hands on material prints of all these maps and guides. Tant pis.

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Today we’re sharing just a small recent job. The Atelier of Taste is a company of our friends, Jola and Mirek, who create and promote vegan, gluten-free recipes and sell such products. Together with a Polish association for gluten-intolerant people they have created T-shirts that people who don’t eat gluten can wear to own their diet choices or needs. And we designed the T-shirts that you can see in the photo.

T-shirt slogans and photo above by Atelier Smaku, models: Jola Słoma and Mirek Trymbulak.

We have already celebrated the big Shakespeare anniversary with our design of all his covers but we have (at least) one more thing to share on this occassion. The most obvious design field connected with Shakespeare are theater posters for his plays and a while ago we started researching those to write about them for the anniversary. But in the end we decided to write only about one designer and his work because it’s so damn good. Our admiration is only slightly colored by the fact that this designer taught both of us about design (and taught us a lot).

The designer in question is professor Tomasz Bogusławski, who is a representative of the so called Polish school of posters – one of a later generation, who uses more modern techniques than his predecessors. Professor Bogusławski creates, among other things, theater posters, often just for the sake of design not for actual theater productions. The posters use photography of common or unusual objects photographed in a way which both emphasizes their materiality and gives them metaphorical or metaphysical depth.

The three Shakespeare posters below are great examples of his unique, confident style and they also reflect well the gloom and mystery of Shakespeare’s tragedies mixed with their realistic element.

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Poster for Hamlet, with bread and a fancy knife. The posters are for “Teatr Rekwizytornia” (something like “props storage room theater”, I guess, which sounds better and more punny in Polish), an imaginary theater Bogusławski made up to create his self-commissioned posters.

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The poster for King Lear uses an old (shoe?) brush and the fact that it looks like an old man with hollowed eyes and a beard. It’s a great example of something that in Polish art schools is called “poster thinking”, where you look at things and see them in several ways at once. The image combines surreal humor and terror, much like the play itself, which is all you can ask from a poster.

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And possibly the strongest, certainly most straightforward and, to us, most memorable of the trio: Titus Andronicus with a head made of raw meat and a twig suggesting Roman laurel (but also playing with the idea of dinner). Frankly, since we saw this poster we can’t conceive of any other image for this play and certainly none that would reflect its pointless brutality better.

It’s possibly too much to hope for but as Tomasz Bogusławski is definitely one of the people who most influenced our thinking about design, maybe you can see some of that inspiration in some of our works. At any rate, we’re happy to share this series of works in honor of Shakespeare’s year.

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